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Jenn Han's avatar

Jenn Han

Low Energy Enthusiasts

Points Total

  • 0 Today
  • 0 This Week
  • 406 Total

Participant Impact

  • up to
    122
    pounds of CO2
    have been saved
  • up to
    120
    minutes
    spent learning
  • up to
    150
    minutes
    being mindful
  • up to
    270
    minutes
    spent outdoors
  • up to
    4
    trees
    planted
  • up to
    270
    gallons of water
    have been saved

Jenn's Actions

Food, Agriculture, and Land Use

Smaller Portions

Reduced Food Waste

I will use smaller plates and/or serve smaller portions when dishing out food.

COMPLETED 1
DAILY ACTION

Food, Agriculture, and Land Use

Tend A Garden

I will tend to a garden, or prepare for one, each day using sustainable gardening practices.

COMPLETED 1
DAILY ACTION

Food, Agriculture, and Land Use

Support Organic Growing Methods

Nutrient Management

I will buy organic cotton and foods grown without the use of synthetic nitrogen fertilizers.

COMPLETED 1
DAILY ACTION

Transportation

Stay on the Ground

Telepresence, High-Speed Rail

Instead of traveling by plane, I will find an alternative way to accomplish the goals of an upcoming trip (i.e. telepresence, vacation locally).

Completed
One-Time Action

Buildings

Fix Leaky Faucets

Low-Flow Fixtures

I will fix faucets or report leaky faucets to facilities that have been wasting up to 9 gallons (34 L) of water a day or 270 (1,020 L) gallons of water a month per faucet.

Completed
One-Time Action

Health and Education

Learn about the Need for Family Planning

Health and Education

I will spend at least 60 minutes learning more about the need for family planning globally.

Completed
One-Time Action

Coastal, Ocean, and Engineered Sinks

Smart Seafood Choices

Ocean Farming

I will visit seafoodwatch.org or download the app and commit to making better seafood choices for a healthier ocean.

Completed
One-Time Action

Land Sinks

Explore My Area

Sometimes protecting nature requires feeling connected to nature. I will invest 120 minutes in exploring and appreciating a natural area in my region, whether a forest, wetland, coastal area, or somewhere else.

Completed
One-Time Action

Action Track: Building Resilience

Plant Trees

Temperate Forest Restoration

I will plant 3 tree(s) in my community, public parks, or backyard.

Completed
One-Time Action

Industry

Become A Master Recycler/Composter

Recycling

I will sign up for a Master Recycler/Composter program in my area.

Completed
One-Time Action

Electricity

Invite a friend to calculate the carbon footprint of their household

Individual actions are important, but people and organizations working together can make a real impact. I will share a carbon calculator with a friend and invite them to calculate the carbon footprint of their household.

Completed
One-Time Action

Action Track: Healing & Renewal

Eat Mindfully

I will eat all of my meals without distractions, e.g., phone, computer, TV, or newspaper.

COMPLETED 3
DAILY ACTIONS

Feed

  • Reflection Question
    Food, Agriculture, and Land Use Tend A Garden
    Have you ever had a significant experience in nature that altered your perspective or focus? If so, please describe it.

    Jenn Han's avatar
    Jenn Han 5/24/2021 11:49 AM
    My boyfriend recently bought potted plants such as basil, rosemary, strawberries, and sunflowers. I helped him pick them out, but unfortunately, whether they would survive or not was entirely up to him and how much he watered them.… I say unfortunately because judging from the photos, they actually need to be watered immediately! Every time I go over, I’ll be making it a point to water them. Plants require care and proper sunlight, and if there’s anything tending to this garden has taught me, it’s that if you don’t care for your plants, they won’t care for you.
    However, tending to this garden has also been incredibly enjoyable. The other day, we made baked potatoes and seasoned them with the rosemary from the garden. It was really nice to tell our friends that the rosemary was homegrown rather than store-bought, and to taste a clear distinction between the two. In addition, the strawberry plant actually did produce a few strawberries, which we enjoyed and hope to see more of. We hope to expand the garden to encompass more vegetables and herbs. 
    One of our friends grows peppers in their front yard, and they brought those over for us to try. There is something incredible about growing your own produce and sharing it with others, incorporating it in your food, and watching your plants grow and provide for you as you water them regularly and provide for them regularly. I find it interesting that certain plants require specific water needs, while other plants are simply once a week. It reminds me that plants are incredibly versatile, and I can’t even imagine what it would be like to have an entire field of such diverse plants that need such differing needs. However, just from our mini garden, I know the results are invaluable, and watching plants grow as you care for them feels rewarding. 
    I have noticed on social media that people are taking up plants like pets, and it’s popular now to be a “plant mom/dad,” and show them off in your room as more of an aesthetic statement than anything else. However, I hope this new appreciation for plants isn’t just a trend that becomes outdated in a few years, but that more people take it up and see the value in it. Plants have so much to offer us, from beautiful flowers to ripe fruit to colorful vegetables. I am at least glad that this aesthetic
    of having plans in your home has started, and hope that it becomes something more in the future

    • Abigail Urbina's avatar
      Abigail Urbina 5/24/2021 5:42 PM
      Hi Jenn!

      I think it’s great that becoming a “plant parent” is met with relatively positive feedback in popular culture. If gardening and helping the environment are considered hobbies that are “cool,” then count me in! I do not personally use TikTok myself, but my roommate tells me that her entire feed is filled with videos on how to successfully tend to plants when living in an apartment. I am proud to say that I have decided to become “plant mom” myself – not necessarily for aesthetic reasons, but for nutritional purposes. It is a bit difficult for me to tend to a large, complete garden at the moment because I am living in a smaller apartment in Westwood, but I am lucky enough to have a balcony outside my unit that is met with lots of sunlight. I am currently growing my own dill and cilantro, both of which are ingredients I frequently use as garnishes on my dishes. I add dill to my kale salads, and I of course love to add cilantro to homemade salsa. 

      You bring up a great point that different plants have different watering needs. Some plants definitely require more watering than others. Luckily for me, the dill and cilantro I grow both need about 1 to 2 inches of water, on average, during a given week. I try to water them a little bit everyday. I plant them next to each other because they have very similar watering needs. If your boyfriend has a tendency to forget to water his plants, I would recommend that he set up daily reminders on his phone. I have found it very helpful to set a daily reminder using the “Reminders” app on my iPhone to let me know when it’s time to water my mini plants. If you are like me, and you are also living in a smaller college apartment, I would recommend trying to plant at least a few ingredients on your balcony if you have one! The whole process is relatively simpler than I once thought. You can go to your local Lowe’s, Home Depot, or Armstrong Garden Center to purchase a potting mix (soil). You can also purchase seeds there for just about any particular ingredient you might want to plant. 

      Although it may not be obvious, planting some of your own herbs is a very sustainable option that can be very beneficial to the environment. Not only do you save money, but you also eliminate the amount of plastic that is wasted on packaging herbs at the grocery store. In addition, you can consume such herbs with the comfort of knowing where it was sourced and whether there were any artificial additives or preservatives placed in them. By planting some of your own ingredients, you are also eliminating the need for carbon emission-generating transportation. Why spend money on ingredients that were driven to the grocery store from far distances when you can conveniently use ingredients grown in your own backyard/balcony for free? If you’re interested in taking on the “challenge” of planting your own ingredients, I have attached a picture of the potting mix that I use. It has worked very well for me so far. I can definitely attest to how rewarding it feels to own a mini garden, so I highly encourage everyone to start out small and begin planting their favorite ingredients.
  • Reflection Question
    Food, Agriculture, and Land Use Smaller Portions
    While dishing food out, we tend to load our plates with more than we need. Using smaller plates helps to mitigate this. Aside from the environmental benefits, what other benefits might come from eating/serving smaller portions?

    Jenn Han's avatar
    Jenn Han 5/24/2021 11:28 AM
    Recently, my family and I decided to replace our old bowls. They were chipped and scratched from many years of use, so we wanted to upgrade. We ended up buying bowls of varying sizes, something we actually never had done before. All of our old bowls were one size, and often way too large. I noticed that ever since we bought these new ones, I’ve been able to portion my food significantly better. I have attached a photo of the bowls we bought, at least two sizes of them. I personally find that I'll use the small bowl most frequently, And this will allow me to portion myself while I eat. If I want more, I can always get a second serving. But, back when we had the old bowls, I didn’t do that. would simply fill it up and not consider portion sizing, But these new bowls have definitely made me more conscious of my portion size, and how much I am eating. It’s actually incredibly nice to be able to quantify it! 
    Using smaller portions not only allows for less food waste, but it also allows for personal gain in that we can ensure we don’t overeat. Whenever I go out to a restaurant, I always ensure that I can bring it home with me and it’ll still last. I stopped ordering fries a while ago, just because I realized that if I wanted to make the most out of my meal, I would need to eat the fries first before getting to the main course of my meal because fries wouldn’t last long the next morning. I would always find myself throwing them out in leftovers and only eating the burger, or the sandwich. So now, I always order a side salad instead of fries. This also, obviously, proves beneficial for my own health. Other foods that I’ve found aren’t very good the next morning are bread/carbs. Hamburger bread just doesn’t taste the same. Potatoes don’t quite taste the same. Leftover salads drenched in dressing do not taste the same either, so it’s important to be aware of what’s in your salad. In the last few months, I’ve definitely been a lot more aware of my portion sizing, splitting my meal in half to enjoy at dinner, but also enjoy the next morning. And desserts, as much as we would love to save them, usually don’t last very long either. 
  • Reflection Question
    Food, Agriculture, and Land Use Support Organic Growing Methods
    It is often said that “you can’t feed the world with just organic food.” What is your response to that statement?

    Jenn Han's avatar
    Jenn Han 5/24/2021 11:11 AM
    I’m really glad I took a photo of this, otherwise I wouldn’t be able to write about it! Last month, my family and I visited a large market of produce that grows organically in Simi Valley. We actually found this place on accident, when we were visiting a friend and got lost on a dirt road - a wonderful find. They allowed visitors to hand pick their own fruit if desired, or shop from a wide selection of fruits grown organically on their fields. It was actually really exciting to be able to walk through the fields themselves and see miles upon miles of green. I saw peach trees, strawberries, lemons, and all sorts of vegetables. I also saw goats and horses, but I was more distracted by plucking fruit of trees and being able to eat them. Although the day it was hot, I enjoyed the time with my family because it was our first time experiencing some thing like this together. There was a truck full of carrots, and I wish I had captured a picture of it! 
    Nonetheless, this prompted the conversation between myself and my mother, who has been looking into growing her own produce at home. As I mentioned in my other posts, we are in the middle of creating our own garden at home. She began to talk about her father, or my grandfather, who worked the fields plucking fruits, cotton, and vegetables for a living. This brought her back to her childhood, and she told us stories of the hours she personally spent picking fruits for a few dollars an hour, if that. Farming can be brutal work, but it can also be beautiful and restorative if handled correctly. Driving along the dirt road, I was pleasantly surprised to see lush green, opposed to brown sand and desert that stretched along for miles. I always get incredibly excited when I get to pick my own fruit, or I’m surrounded by organically grown produce. I feel like I want to eat it all. Everything suddenly becomes a lot more exciting, and an apple grown on the farm is suddenly much more enticing than one you’d see at the store. Sweets that are made with organic products are suddenly more tasty than your bag of cookies at Ralph’s. I will admit, I do get overly excited at that, but it’s such a great feeling walking through the market where you know everything is cared for and grown naturally. 
  • Reflection Question
    Land Sinks Explore My Area
    How can spending more time outdoors enhance your sense of place -- your deep knowledge of and appreciation for your surroundings?

    Jenn Han's avatar
    Jenn Han 5/24/2021 10:55 AM
    E
    I feel like I do this so regularly that I don’t even really take notice. However, recently, I’ve started to document places that I visit for the sake of remembering where they are, remembering how I was able to connect with nature, and what that place offered. From beaches, to hikes, to lakes, I never realized the plethora of natural areas around me that I could enjoy.
    My family and I recently went on a hike during sunset, and this was a time to really connect with nature, the mountains, and the flowers around me. I didn’t go on hikes too often before, but now I’m taking a liking to them. Some people think that in order to go on a really good hike, you need to go far. This is absolutely far from the truth. I have since discovered many great hiking spots near my home, some of them just a short drive away, others a little longer, but definitely still worth checking out because they’re local! I have attached a few photos of the various places I have visited locally — or within an hour’s drive. 
    Outside of hiking, I have obviously visited beaches, gone kayaking, and visited lakes. This really just showed me that you don’t need to go far to have a mini vacation—or a staycation. 
    In fact, just last week, my friends and I went to a lake that is about 20 minutes from my house. My family and I used to go there all the time and feed the ducks, and people also frequently boat out on the lake or hang out on the grass. Whenever I go to this lake, I always feel like I’ve taken a step away from the city and into nature. Despite this lake being smack dab in the middle of the city, ironically, it feels a bit removed. I actually really enjoy coming here because it feels like I can breathe easier and relax, while not dealing with the hassle of needing to book a hotel or drive long distances to do so. This isn’t to say that you can’t or shouldn’t travel long distances, because we certainly have. Places like Lake Tahoe, the Grand Canyon, Yosemite,, and so forth are absolutely worth visiting, but when you just want a day to feel the same way you would when visiting these places, local areas are definitely where to go

    • Blake Salfer's avatar
      Blake Salfer 5/24/2021 8:19 PM
      Hi Jenn, these pictures that you included are great! I always try to take some pictures whenever I go hiking or to the beach just because of how cool it usually looks, but I think it is a great thing to do for connecting with nature and remembering natural areas. When I have been at school in Los Angeles, some of the most fun times I have had have been with friends camping, going to the beach, going skiing, or hiking. Recently I have been hearing and reading a lot about how we are so disconnected from nature these days and it can severely impact our mental health. I find that sometimes when I have a lot of schoolwork and a busy schedule I put off going outside and exercising first to save time. This is something I need to get better at doing because I think even going for close-by hikes/walks would help me deal with the stress of a busy schedule more. Humans haven't adapted to live inside all day or live in cities with no connection with nature. I think that is why people that live closest to nature are oftentimes the most appreciative of it and try the hardest to protect. Because they understand the benefits that we can get from being exposed to nature. I know that I am always happier when I am outside and exploring cool places, whether that be a national park or say the botanical gardens on campus.     
  • Reflection Question
    Industry Become A Master Recycler/Composter
    What could you do differently to waste less?

    Jenn Han's avatar
    Jenn Han 5/24/2021 10:30 AM

    So my family and I actually recycle regularly! When we first started, it was simple and small: plain plastic water bottles. However, when I moved off to college, that’s when I seriously started to recycle. Just a small anecdote here: I used to drink bottled tea a lot during my first two years of college. I had a mini fridge where I would constantly keep plastic bottles of drinks, whether that was cold-brew Starbucks coffee, fruit juices, tea, or water bottles, I went through plastic bottles pretty quickly. I always made an effort to recycle, so I would put those bottles in plastic bags and I would visit home every two weeks. Every time I went home, I would pack those plastic bottles into a large suitcase… And yes, it was always full. My sister would then recycle those bottles, plus the ones we had from home, and she would sort through them in our backyard: plastic, glass, non-recyclable, and so on. I remember one time she had so many bottles that my mom and I had to help her sort through them because there were just way too many. We filled at least three very large black trash bags full of them! 
    Recycling is a natural part of how we run things at home. We have a trash bin specifically for food/other, and a trash bin specifically for recycling. I would ideally like to have one for composting only, 
    During senior year, my roommates weren’t exactly conscientious about recycling, so I always set a bag aside and made it clear that they were to toss any and all recyclable material in this designated bag. And just like I did all of college, I brought those things back home for my family and I to actively recycle. 
    If we didn’t recycle, I’m pretty sure I would feel incredibly strange about it. I’ve gotten so used to sorting through plastic bottles and ensuring that they go in the recycling but not doing this feels unnatural. I know a lot of my friends aren’t as picky about it, but this is basically how I grew up doing it, and recycling has pretty much been a core practice in our home. I’m not exactly pleased to say that we always had a lot to recycle — that’s gotten me to really consider our plastic use, and buying products that use plastic. I plan to look further into how to minimize the plastic products that we buy. 
    Something that also came to mind was when I was younger, I was pretty cognizant of the fact that using one plastic water bottle and tossing it out was pretty wasteful. So, in an effort to conserve plastic, and rather naïvely, I reused a plastic water bottle for a very long time. I would drink the water in the bottle, and then refill it with water from home and take that to school every day. This probably wasn’t the smartest idea, but I think I had the right idea in mind. Of course, this was way before I knew about Hydroflasks and reusable water bottles! Now, I obviously take my Hydroflask everywhere I go, one way to reduce plastic bottle usage. Now, my family and I solely rely on reusable water bottles. We have at least 8 of them — not that we need that many, but oftentimes we will fill them up with water to be able to turn off our water filter for the day and simply pour water from the flasks themselves. 

    • Neha Joshi's avatar
      Neha Joshi 5/24/2021 11:51 AM
      Hi Jenn!
      Nice work with the recycling! Your commitment to recycling is very admirable. I also try my best to recycle as much as possible. We have a recycling trash can in my apartment and my roommates and I are generally pretty good about making sure that everything that can be recycled ends up in that bin. Like you, I’m a big fan of cold brew! However, it comes in plastic cups so I’m trying to reduce how much cold brew I drink as a result. I know that before the pandemic, starbucks allowed people to bring their own cups and mugs if they wanted. I’m hoping that once the pandemic settles down, they will reinstitute this policy. I will definitely be bringing reusable cups and mugs to get coffee! 

      Like you, I also try to carry around my hydroflask wherever I go. I try to avoid buying plastic water bottles on the road and so keeping my hydroflask with me is a great way to get around that. Like your family, everyone in mine also uses a reusable water bottle. I can’t remember the last time we bought plastic water bottles. However, I’ve realized that some of my friends are less inclined to do so. They don’t see a huge issue with buying plastic water bottles when they need to. I’ve learned so much from this class and have tried to relay as much of what I have learned to my friends in the hopes that it will make them reconsider some of their unsustainable practices. 

      It’s kind of disheartening to think about how some people care a lot about the unfolding climate crisis, while some don’t care at all. I’m really inspired by Tamar and Randy’s zero waste lifestyle. While I don’t lead a zero waste lifestyle, I would love to get there! It’s kind of insane to think about how people like Randy and Tamar are doing so much to help the environment while some people refuse to even acknowledge the issue! I hope that more people educate themselves on the issue and find ways to make more sustainable choices in their daily life. 

  • Reflection Question
    Health and Education Learn about the Need for Family Planning
    What did you learn about the need for family planning? How do the needs of different people in different places compare to each other?

    Jenn Han's avatar
    Jenn Han 5/24/2021 10:09 AM
    After reading on family planning and watching the TEDtalk, “How empowering women and girls can help stop global warming,” I had a lot to say about this particular topic. Sorry this is long, but… 
    I once took a class that talked about how our population and our ecosystem are closely correlated. We read an article about the link between access to contraceptives and overpopulation, and how this in turn impacted the rest of the community when faced with diseases and resource shortages like food and water. This study was conducted in rural India, where a vast majority of the population do not have access to appropriate medical care and intervention. A lot of them rely on small clinics run by doctors who can’t possibly care for everyone needing attention. I remember the paper distinctly discussing the lack of education in women regarding contraceptive use, a problem resulting in a large percentage of unplanned pregnancies. Unfortunately, because of this, women find themselves caring for families much larger than ever planned. I wish I could find the article, but even just looking on places like Google scholar, you can find countless studies that detail this same exact problem.
    As someone who wants to work in the medical field, this particular issue is one of deep interest to me. I am incredibly interested in going to low income rural areas in underdeveloped countries, and helping mitigate problems like these. In Katherine Wilkinson’s TEDTalk, she discussed how women are often overlooked, and the link between us and global warming is ignored— but the connection is so clear to anyone who chooses to look! It’s so evident that it’s surprising that minimal attention has been placed on this issue. When we think of ways to stop climate change, we often consider renewable energy, stopping fuel emissions, increasing forests — the easiest things to point out. But no one considers our ever-growing population and how to combat this— or at least, they consider wrong solutions. So simply put, it’s education. A large percentage of pregnancies here in the U.S. are also unplanned, and a lot of them could easily be preventable through education, particularly in low income areas of our country. In addition, contraceptives are incredibly expensive for some, while others simply aren’t aware, or shamed into not using them (an opinion shaped by cultural beliefs). This problem of lack of education isn’t just a distant issue overseas. It’s here, right in our own country. It also doesn’t help that there is much divide surrounding contraceptive use, promoting a stigma around women who do actively pursue them. Although this is getting better, the lack of accessibility proves a barrier. 
    I decided to do some further reading about family planning and how this is linked to global warming. It is obvious that the larger families get, the more our population will increase, and the more resources we use up/greater emissions we emit. But something I can’t quite get over is how overlooked this issue truly is. We hear all the time in the news that space agencies are looking for ways to colonize new planets in order to solve our population crisis, always looking to expand, explore, and find new life elsewhere. Admittedly, “ we launched a rocket into space and colonized this planet” sounds a lot cooler than “We sent teams to Haiti to educate women on fertility and provide access to contraceptives,” but if I had the choice, I’d pour all the resources into the latter. Because then, at least, we are investing in the people on our planet here and now, and instead of looking for ways to escape the inevitable, we are actively creating solutions now. This theme of always looking beyond what we have is actually very relevant to a book I recently read, called, “Love After The End” by Joshua Whitehead. It’s a collection of stories revolving around the aftermath of climate change/human exploration and the intersectionality with sexuality and indigenous identity. I know that sounds really complex, but in reality, it highlights stories of indigenous  individuals who identify as LGBTQ+ detailing their experiences through climate disasters, a changing world where technology rules, and the consequences of climate change. There’s also touches back to a point that the TEDTalk discussed: women are more likely to be harmed when faced with climate change. We are ultimately the most impacted, and yet, we could fix so much of the current problem at hand if the right attention and education is pushed for (not that we’ll fix everything!). Ultimately, the needs of different people in different places comes down to the same solutions of requiring further education, access, and equity.
  • Reflection Question
    Electricity Invite a friend to calculate the carbon footprint of their household
    What kinds of discussions did you have, or are you hoping to have with friends about climate change?

    Jenn Han's avatar
    Jenn Han 5/24/2021 9:18 AM

    I invited my best friend over to hang out, and we calculated our carbon footprints. We come from very different households, but very similar lifestyles. My family and I actively recycle, hers doesn’t. I don’t own any pets, but she has 3 cats. She buys and eats what she wants when she wants, and my family and I often cook in bulk to ensure we finish off what we first made during the week. When we calculated our carbon footprint, mine was 5.2 and hers was 9.9. I often take public transportation, while she owns her own car and drives around. In fact, driving around is almost a hobby of hers. It helps her clear her head, despite wasting a bunch of gas and releasing emissions. I know there is a lot I need to do in order to decrease my carbon footprint, and so we had a discussion about this when we calculated ours.
    She actively stays away from certain water bottle  brands, certain clothing brands, and buys specific foods — she is the one who actually introduced me to the vegetarian sausages. After having a discussion, I realized there is plenty we can do to reduce our carbon footprints. She will be moving off to Scotland for a year or two to pursue her masters, and her original plan was to take a boat there. She absolutely despises planes, and would rather drive/take a boat to some destination than fly, so at least there’s that. However, due to the pandemic, cruises and passenger ships are currently stalled. So now she must fly, which is incredibly unfortunate. 
    Instead of buying water bottles and waste in plastic, she could buy her own Hydro flask and store water there. And, she could also pick up recycling. Some thing that I could do is continue recycling, continue using my Hydro flask to store water, continue my current practices of reducing water/electric waste, and also resort to healthier meals, expand my garden, and start composting. I’ve been looking a little bit into how to compost recently, because I do notice that despite our best efforts, my family and I sometimes encounter ourselves wasting food. Whether that’s something expired in the fridge, or a meal too large to finish, composting would be incredibly useful. 
  • Reflection Question
    Buildings Fix Leaky Faucets
    What are other easy and low-cost ways to reduce your water usage at home?

    Jenn Han's avatar
    Jenn Han 5/24/2021 8:54 AM
    For the longest time, the shower faucet in our bathroom would leak. It got so wasteful that we began using a large bucket to catch the water and use it for something else. In addition, our water takes forever to heat up, so we use that same bucket to ensure water — despite being cold — isn’t wasted either. Before this, I would just turn on the faucet and wait for the water to heat up, which takes about a minute, and let all that cold water go down the drain. I didn’t really stop to think about the gallons of water I was wasting, but now I do. 
    So with our leaky faucet, we replaced this through a YouTube video. I’d say we did a decent job, except the handle doesn’t turn as far as our old one, and our water doesn’t heat up to nearly as hot as it used to… So, we’ll need to fix it, or replace it again to get our very-hot water back, rather than moderately-warm.  Another thing I noticed is our water now fluctuates in temperature, which actually really sucks. So, despite the fact that I was able to install this new faucet on my own, I think I might’ve seriously  messed something up. Nonetheless, after this whole ordeal, I definitely learned about how to conserve water. In my house, we’ve made it an active effort to conserve power and electricity; unplug things that aren’t being actively used, turn off power strips not in use, store water in hydroflasks to avoid turning on our water filter so much. In addition, we’ve bought lamps so we no longer use our ceiling lights at all; When the TV isn’t being used, it’s unplugged, too. 
    We are hoping all of this will decrease our power and electricity bill, at least by a little bit. Another project we have yet to take on is to replace our other bathtub faucet; when it pulls up to allow for a shower, it doesn’t go all the way, resulting in a lot of water not being redirected. This not only wastes a lot of water, but also allows for less in a shower. I hope we’re able to get this done soon because that shower is the only one that allows for stable, hot water — and I think we’ll have it professionally fixed because I’d hate to  mess that one up too! 

  • Jenn Han's avatar
    Jenn Han 5/24/2021 8:49 AM
    ACTION: Eat Mindfully (cont.) Post #5: 

    For my last post on this action, I’d like to share something I’ve been doing recently that I’ve enjoyed quite a lot. This isn’t really food, but it is hot cocoa, and I still enjoyed it fully immersed with a campfire going and a trickling water fountain nearby. My mom has been making it a habit to clean up our yard and start planting fruit trees (see my other post!), and we bought a fire pit to add to the ambience. Probably one of the best decisions we made, not to mention adding string lights to our patio and a cute hammock! However, last week, I sat outside with my family to enjoy a cup of warm cocoa beside the fire, and it was an incredibly relaxing experience. My family and I used to go camping all the time when I was younger, so I definitely miss sitting by a fire and enjoying a hot meal/hot drink. I miss swimming in the lake, and being deeply immersed in nature amongst the forest. I miss falling asleep to the sounds of animals in the trees, the wind rustling the leaves, and crickets in the night. And I miss being far away from the city, away from the buzz of cars and people— but for now, this is as close as I can get without driving a ways away. 
    We set up the fire pit and my sister made some great cocoa. We usually boil some milk and mix in chocolate chips; at least this way, you control the consistency and flavor of your cocoa, but at times we do just use some hot chocolate powder and call it good. Sitting by the fire with family and enjoying my cocoa, we talked about a lot of things; my graduation, recent trips to the Grand Canyon/Yosemite I went to (see photos!), and how everyone else was. We talked about our opinions on the current news happening around the world, and then, we didn’t talk at all and simply enjoyed the sounds of nature — a conversation in itself. The crickets, the trickling of water from the water fountain a few feet away, the smell of wood burning, the fire as it danced in the wind and as my family’s faces flickered in the glow. We’re making it a habit to sit down and enjoy a few hours of campfire time. We usually start around 5PM and don’t wrap up until well after 9PM. It’s a great time to spend with family, or at least, outside and away from a screen. It’s also a time to wind down and focus on one thing at a time — and I really enjoyed being able to do that. My sister now asks me if I want to “hang out” by setting up a fire and drinking some tea, which we didn’t do before! “Hang out” meant for to the movies or the mall together, but I’m glad we’ve found something else, and it’s helped us enjoy a little piece of our childhood this way too. 



  • Jenn Han's avatar
    Jenn Han 5/24/2021 8:42 AM
    ACTION Eat Mindfully  (cont.) Post #4

    Today I opted for simplicity and had a plate of grilled asparagus. This is actually my favorite vegetable ever — I could eat it all day and still love it the next day. Recently, though, I’ve been trying out other vegetables, like my newfound love for Brussels Sprouts. I now order them every time a restaurant has them because they’re just so good! I didn’t eat vegetables often growing up; strangely, I remember eating McDonald’s more than I remember a full plate of vegetables on the table. 
    So now that I’m able to fully recognize what I put into my body and what’s good for me, I’ve taken to vegetables and fruits. I find I enjoy my food a lot more when it’s just my plate and myself, with no distractions to take away from the experience. This kind of makes me think about how our culture naturally encourages us to eat distractedly, almost like if you DON’T, you’re not doing it right. At the movies, you eat popcorn and snacks and watch the movie. At dinner, you watch a TV show — even AT restaurants, they have TVs all over the place to watch sports or the news, as if people’s’ company isn’t enough to entertain you. This was  sad to realize, because distracted eating is so strongly encouraged. Even if the restaurant doesn’t have a TV, they have music blaring— so, really, it’s everywhere. I’d like to find a restaurant where you sit down and eat amongst plants and sunshine, no music or TV anywhere. 
    I think one thing that outdoor dining has at least helped with is this. People must eat outside exposed to the sun and with no — or minimal — music! Suddenly, people have to listen to themselves think. I’ve noticed that at outdoor dining places, I’m much less distracted from my food, opposed to indoor seating where I’m more focused on the song that’s playing, or the cool LED lighting around the restaurant.  And I feel, when outdoor dining, I enjoy my food a lot more because I’m actually focused on it.